About

This site is maintained by Jez Humble. You can hire me to give workshops or talks on a variety of topics including continuous delivery, product management, organizational culture, software engineering, and the lean/agile paradigm.

The source code for this site is available at GitHub. If you have suggestions on how to improve it, please create an issue. This website is based on Jekyll, and the template is modified from the 18F template. You can find copyright and license information in the footer at the bottom of this page.

If you’re interested in discussing more about continuous delivery, there’s an umoderated continuous delivery mailing list on Google Groups.

Dave Farley is co-author of the original continuous delivery book. He has a blog and a company, Continuous Delivery Ltd, that does consulting based out of the UK.

Biography

Jez Humble is co-author of The DevOps Handbook, Lean Enterprise, and the Jolt Award winning Continuous Delivery. He has spent his career tinkering with code, infrastructure, and product development in companies of varying sizes across three continents, most recently working for the US Federal Government at 18F. He is currently researching how to build high performing teams at his startup, DevOps Research and Assessment LLC, and teaching at UC Berkeley.

Disclosures

I work at the University of California, Berkeley. This site is not maintained as part of my official work duties, and is not endorsed by UC Berkeley. I also derive income from DevOps Research and Assessment, LLC, which I co-founded, as well as from royalties from my books and related content. If you buy my stuff via the links on this site, I get a cut from the vendor, whether Amazon or InformIT. All my investments are in wide-ranging mutual funds.

A note on contacting me

The best way to reach me is by email at humble@acm.org, but unfortunately due to the large amount of email I receive I’m afraid I can’t guarantee a timely response, or indeed any response at all unless your query is short and has a simple yes/no answer. In particular, I have learned from experience not to offer advice over the internet. If you’re not sure how to proceed, I have two pieces of general advice: first, work from first principles. Second, apply the scientific method: Mike Rother’s Improvement Kata is an excellent resource.